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Is Oxbridge Notes A Scam?

The short answer is "no", but it's understandable that if you've never heard of this us before, you might want some reassurances that the business exists and treats their customers well.

Here are some signals which we hope will reassure you:

  • You can see the name of the business owner, Jack Kinsella on the about page. And cross-reference that on LinkedIn, perhaps contacting people in your shared network to confirm validity.
  • We've existed for more than a decade and you can find links online mentioning us from long ago. To confirm, do a Google search for our site and set the date range between 10 and 5 years ago.
  • Our payments are via PayPal (and credit card). In both cases you can cancel the payment post-facto if you didn't receive what you paid for. On top of that, both of these entities police their sellers and ban any website that has a complaint rate over about 1%.
  • We offer refunds to anyone who is unhappy. No questions asked. We want satisfied customers. Otherwise what's the point in being in business.
  • Contact details and taxation numbers of the owner are listed¬†on our imprint page.
  • Finally, there's the question of motives. Would it really be worth our while to create such an elaborate scam? Why would we invest hundreds of thousands in an expensive website, or in creating 1600+ pages devoted to teaching people about specific law case summaries in the UK? And if we had all those skills in-house, why would we need to scam anyone? Those same skills are highly valued in the employment marketplace can more easily used to create a legitimate and profitable business.